October 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New Poetry

October 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New Poetry
 
Find out which authors are reading here soon, see which titles indie booksellers are loving, and check out the latest in Poetry. But first....
 
New & Upcoming Releases
 
These books are among the most anticipated new releases. Click on a cover or title to order from our website.
by Ann Patchett
Out Now!
 
At the end of the Second World War, Cyril Conroy combines luck and a single canny investment to begin an enormous real estate empire, propelling his family from poverty to enormous wealth. His first order of business is to buy the Dutch House, a lavish estate in the suburbs outside of Philadelphia. Meant as a surprise for his wife, the house sets in motion the undoing of everyone he loves. The story is told by Cyril's son Danny, as he and his older sister, the brilliantly acerbic and self-assured Maeve, are exiled from the house where they grew up by their stepmother. The Dutch House is the story of a paradise lost, a tour de force that digs deeply into questions of inheritance, love and forgiveness, of how we want to see ourselves and of who we really are. Filled with suspense, you may read it quickly to find out what happens, but what happens to Danny and Maeve will stay with you for a very long time.
by Chris Colfer
Out: October 1
 
A new series set in the Land of Stories universe! When Brystal Evergreen stumbles across a secret section of the library, she discovers a book that introduces her to a world beyond her imagination and learns the impossible: She is a fairy capable of magic! But in the oppressive Southern Kingdom, women are forbidden from reading and magic is outlawed, so Brystal is swiftly convicted of her crimes and sent to the miserable Bootstrap Correctional Facility. But with the help of the mysterious Madame Weatherberry, Brystal is whisked away and enrolled in an academy of magic! Adventure comes with a price, however, and when Madame Weatherberry is called away to attend to an important problem, she doesn't return. Do Brystal and her classmates have what it takes to stop a sinister plot that risks the fate of the world, and magic, forever?
by J.K. Rowling and Jim Kay
Out: October 8
 
The fourth book in the Harry Potter series is now illustrated in glorious full color by award-winning artist Jim Kay. Harry Potter wants to get away from the pernicious Dursleys and go to the International Quidditch Cup with Hermione, Ron, and the Weasleys. He wants to dream about Cho Chang, his crush (and maybe do more than dream). He wants to find out about the mysterious event involving two other rival schools of magic, and a competition that hasn't happened for a hundred years. He wants to be a normal, fourteen-year-old wizard. Unfortunately for Harry Potter, he's not normal--even by wizarding standards. And in this case, different can be deadly.
by Elizabeth Strout
Out: October 15
 
Prickly, wry, resistant to change yet ruthlessly honest and deeply empathetic, Olive Kitteridge is "a compelling life force" (San Francisco Chronicle). The New Yorker has said that Elizabeth Strout "animates the ordinary with an astonishing force," and she has never done so more clearly than in these pages, where the iconic Olive struggles to understand not only herself and her own life but the lives of those around her in the town of Crosby, Maine. Whether with a teenager coming to terms with the loss of her father, a young woman about to give birth during a hilariously inopportune moment, a nurse who confesses a secret high school crush, or a lawyer who struggles with an inheritance she does not want to accept, the unforgettable Olive will continue to startle us, to move us, and to inspire moments of transcendent grace.
 
First Friday
 
On October 4, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
One lucky adult will win:
 
by Jeff Merkley
 
This book is an exposé and cry of outrage at the cruelty and chaos the Trump administration has wrought at the border with child separations, border blockades, and a massive gulag of child prisons housing thousands. Jeff Merkley couldn't believe his eyes. He never dreamed the United States could treat vulnerable young families with such calculated brutality. Few had witnessed what Merkley discovered just by showing up at the border and demanding to see what was going on behind closed doors. America Is Better Than This tells the inside story of how one senator, with no background as an immigration activist, became a leading advocate for reform of the brutal policies that have created a humanitarian crisis on the southern U.S. border. It represents the heartfelt and candid voice of a concerned American who believes his country stands for something far bigger and better.
And our kids prize is:
 
by Elisha Cooper
 
A breathtaking adventure as a traveler and her canoe begin their trek down the Hudson River. In a mountain lake, the canoe gently enters the water's edge, paddling toward the river. The nautical journey begins. In Cooper's flowing prose and stunning watercolor scenes, readers can follow along the trek as the woman and her canoe explore the wildlife, flora and fauna, and urban landscape at the river's edge. Through perilous weather and river rushes, the canoe and her captain survive and maneuver their way down the river back home.
 
Upcoming Author Readings
Poetry Reading
Tuesday, October 1, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes Airlie Press poets Gary Lark, Jessica Mehta, and Hannah Larrabee. Oregon poet Gary Lark will read from his new collection, Ordinary Gravity. These haunting poems drop you into a world of logging towns of western Oregon in the fifties and sixties—a way of life undergoing change—with forays into the small towns, the woods, and on the rivers. Oregon poet Jessica Mehta will read from her new collection, Savagery, which joins Mehta's oeuvre as a reflection of what it means to be indigenous in today's increasingly hostile, post-colonial America. Hannah Larrabee will read from her new poetry collection, Wonder Tissue.
Poetry Reading
Thursday, October 3, 7pm
 
Local poets Sara Quinn Rivara and Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet will be reading from their latest collections. Animal Bride is the second collection of poems from Portland poet Sara Quinn Rivara. These poems are written at the crossroads of womanhood: to be a woman in captivity or a woman breaking free. Like a 21st century Persephone, the woman at the heart of Animal Bride journeys out of the underworld of a violent marriage to find strength in her animal self. In The Greenhouse, Portland poet Lisa Gluskin Stonestreet details the dual desires of new motherhood the struggle to make peace with both connection and separation, with being a self irrevocably tied to another self. In lines both fluid and broken, delicate and irreverent, these lyrics recount with boundless love the difficulty of finding oneself again as a parent, and the elemental joy of being transformed by the very life that tethers you.
Historical Fiction Reading
Monday, October 7, 7pm
 
Northwest authors Jane Kirkpatrick and Rachel Fordham will be reading from their latest historical novels. Kirkpatrick new novel is One More River to Cross. In 1844, two years before the Donner Party, the Stevens-Murphy company left Missouri to be the first wagons into California through the Sierra Nevada Mountains. When the party separates in three directions, each risks losing those they loved and faces the prospect of learning that adversity can destroy or redefine. Washington author Rachel Fordham's new novel is Yours Truly, Thomas. Penny Ercanbeck is a clerk at the Dead Letter Office. When a letter from a brokenhearted man to his one true love falls into her hands, it becomes Penny's mission to place this lost letter into the hands of its intended recipient. When Penny's undertaking leads her to the intriguing man who touched her soul with his words, everything grows more complicated. She wants to find the rightful owner of the letter and yet she finds herself caring--perhaps too much--for the one who wrote it.
No Way to Die
Tuesday, October 8, 7pm
 
In the Oregon author's seventh book in the mystery series, attorney Cal Claxton is fishing with his daughter, Claire, the coastal area south of Coos Bay when a body is discovered in the river. As an investigation is launched into the suspicious death, Cal and Claire find themselves drawn into the life of the local bookshop owner and vocal environmental activist, whose grandson was convicted for murder at age sixteen. She believes he was wrongly accused and convinces Cal to reexamine the case. Together, Cal and Claire dig deep into the secrets and crumbling alliances that form the foundation of this small coastal community, and what they find could spell doom for them both...
Still Come Home
Wednesday, October 9, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes back Katey Schultz to read from her latest novel. When the odds are stacked against you, doing everything right still might not be enough to protect yourself and the ones you love. The three characters in Still Come Home are each searching for the best way to be, the best way to live—all the while fighting cultural, societal, and political forces far beyond their control. As their paths intersect over the span of three days, Still Come Home explores how their decisions will forever alter each other's lives.
Frank's Revenge
Monday, October 14, 7pm
 
Former Portland Police homicide detective Don DuPay is a crime fighter turned crime writer. Read along as he brings private eye Frank McAllister to life as he scours the back alleys and dead-end streets of Portland's dangerous Albina ghetto in search of a killer. Be his backup as he works to solve the murders the police don't care about. But why? And what about the council of old gangsters who lured him into the case using a pretty woman as bait? What do they really want? Things get messy as Black Bart returns from eight years in prison vowing to once again be the kingpin of the St. Johns drug business and take his old territory back, but now the ghetto dealers wear badges and, oh yeah, he wants his old girlfriend back, too. Then there's Indian Charlie, tenderloin denizen, with his secrets of death and destruction. And just where is the "Blind Pig" anyway? Written in the style of Boston Blackie and Mike Hammer...sorta.
The Scent of Buenos Aires
Tuesday, October 15, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes Maureen Shaughnessy, translator of The Scent of Buenos Aires: Stories, by Hebe Uhart. the first book-length English translation of Uhart's work, drawing together her best vignettes of quotidian life: moments at the zoo, the hair salon, or a cacophonous homeowners association meeting. She writes in unconventional, understated syntax, constructing a delightfully specific perspective on life in South America. These stories are marked by sharp humor and wit: discreet and subtle, yet filled with eccentric and insightful characters. Uhart's narrators pose endearing questions about their lives and environments - one asks "Bees - do you know how industrious they are?" while another inquires, "Are we perhaps going to hell in a hand basket?"
The Iconist
Wednesday, October 16, 7pm
 
The Portland author will discuss his book. With the rise of digital media and advertising, a constant barrage of information makes it nearly impossible to be seen and heard. In The Iconist, branding and design strategist Jamie Mustard shows you how individuals, organizations, and brands can break through the noise. For businesses, marketers, teachers, advertisers, artists--from thought leaders to anyone trying to write a resume--The Iconist shows how to grab and hold attention. Fair warning, though: This book will change the way you view your audience . . . and the entire world around you.
Street Journalist
Wednesday, October 23, 7pm
 
Portland journalist Lisa Loving will be reading from her book, Street Journalist: Understand and Report the News in Your Community. Responsible journalism begins with you! A corrupt politician. A local business in trouble. A neighbor with a heroic story. An opportunity to work together for positive change. Whatever the stories are in your community that most need to be told, the best person to tell them is you. Whether you're writing for your local newspaper, producing a podcast or video series, or simply sharing what you see and learn every day on social media, the power of journalism is in your hands, as is the responsibility to use it ethically and wisely.
Joy Seeker
Tuesday, October 29, 7pm
 
Join Portland self-help author Shannon Kaiser for the launch of her new book, Joy Seeker: Let Go of What's Holding You Back So You Can Live the Life You Were Made For. The relentless pressure to succeed, measure up, and reach for ever higher goals can leave us feeling like we're just not good enough—or that something's missing. At the end of the day, after giving it our all, the last thing we want to feel is hopeless, anxious, and disconnected. Kaiser understands why so many of us, despite our best intentions, cling to these patterns. Better yet, she knows how to get us out of the vicious, draining cycle. Committed to finding meaning, connection, and joy in our day-to-day lives, she's traveled the world in search of the universal truths and spiritual wisdom we desperately need today. Joy Seeker is her transformational approach to life, drawn from her own life-changing experiences. It is a path to discovering our true self—the hero within.
Far West
Wednesday, October 30, 7pm
 
The Portland author will be reading from his latest collection of poems, Far West, which intertwines the past and present, as time alternates between racing and standing still. Crafting poems that confront memory lapses and painful recollections, Skloot traces his moments of purest perception and expression: his wife practicing music, his daughter finding delight in the presence of wildlife, Vladimir Nabokov able to lose himself when playing goalie in a soccer match. In poems that range from traditional forms and short lyrics to longer narratives and free verse, Skloot explores how emotional experiences--memory and forgetting, love and loss, reverie and urgent attention--all come together in our search for coherence and authentic self-expression.
 
Indie Next
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for October 2019.
by Rene Denfeld
 
"Rene Denfeld has done it again: written a mystery that sucks you in and thoroughly absorbs you until you're done. We pick up the story with Naomi Cottle, who has been searching for the sister she left behind when she escaped the clutches of their childhood kidnapper. Haunted by guilt, her search leads her back to her hometown, where a number of young girls have been murdered. By chance or by fate, she encounters Celia, a 12-year-old girl living on the streets who may be the key to everything—including finding her sister and a rapacious killer. Heart-wrenching, thought-provoking, and utterly unputdownable, this really should be the gold standard for mysteries." —Destinee Hodge, East City Bookshop, Washington, DC
by Ta-Nehisi Coates
 
"Ta-Nehisi Coates understands something big and he understands it better than anyone else right now. The Water Dancer led me on a journey up and down the landscape of American slavery with a narrative that feels like The Book of Exodus meets, well, Ta-Nehisi Coates. Over 400 pages I have cried, I have laughed, I have been educated, and I have been enlightened. Coates writes with an honesty that can only come from a sublime, even spiritual, understanding of the souls of the white man and the black man in America. Written with poignancy and humanity, The Water Dancer left me stunned but clear-headed, like I had just been woken up from a deep, dream-filled sleep." —Norris Rettiger, Lemuria Bookstore, Jackson, MS
by Stephen Chbosky
 
"Imaginary Friend has, in my humble opinion, already earned its spot on the top shelf of classic horror novels. Reminiscent of Stephen King's It and Neil Gaiman's Coraline, it is one of the most compulsively terrifying, eerily uncanny novels of our time. Once you pick up this book, you won’t put it down until you’ve devoured it whole (or, should I say, it has devoured you), and once finished, you will feel the dangerous urge to turn to the first page and start all over again. It is an utterly original masterpiece of fear. Thank you, Stephen Chbosky, for the lost sleep and the goosebumps! Signed, a hard-to-scare horror fanatic." —Tianna Moxley, the river’s end bookstore, Oswego, NY
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Susan Orlean
 
"There is no one better at investigating the fascinating stories hiding in plain sight than Susan Orlean. The vivid descriptions of the fire that engulfed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986 are burnished by the meticulous research she did on the history of libraries and on the shocking event that resulted in the destruction and damage of over one million books. The mystery of who would start such a fire is woven between stories of eccentric librarians and the transformation of Los Angeles in the 20th century. From memories of the blissful hours spent in the library of her youth to the historical significance of these repositories of our past, Orlean has crafted a love letter to the importance of the written word and those who devote their lives to its preservation."
— Luisa Smith, Book Passage, Corte Madera, C
by Nicole Chung
 
"Nicole Chung's memoir is a moving account of a young woman's gradually evolving understanding of family and of herself as she uncovers the truth about the circumstances behind her adoption. Refusing the false dichotomy of adoption as inherently positive or negative, she reminds us that adoption is a fact and that it's always complicated. This is an extraordinary account, told with candor and empathy. Though the transracial adoption of Asian Americans into white families and communities is common, few books have been written from the perspective of the adoptee. Chung has much to teach us, and readers approaching this book with a heart as open as hers will find much to nourish them here." —Karen Maeda Allman, The Elliott Bay Book Company, Seattle, WA
 
New Poetry
by Joy Harjo
 
In the early 1800s, the Mvskoke people were forcibly removed from their original lands east of the Mississippi to Indian Territory, which is now part of Oklahoma. Two hundred years later, Joy Harjo returns to her family's lands and opens a dialogue with history. In An American Sunrise, Harjo finds blessings in the abundance of her homeland and confronts the site where her people, and other indigenous families, essentially disappeared. From her memory of her mother's death, to her beginnings in the native rights movement, to the fresh road with her beloved, Harjo's personal life intertwines with tribal histories to create a space for renewed beginnings. Her poems sing of beauty and survival, illuminating a spirituality that connects her to her ancestors and thrums with the quiet anger of living in the ruins of injustice. A descendent of storytellers and "one of our finest--and most complicated--poets" (Los Angeles Review of Books), Joy Harjo continues her legacy with this latest powerful collection.
by Timothy Donnelly
 
Donnelly's third collection, The Problem of the Many, is the poetry of the future yet further pressed to the end of history. In astonishingly textured poems powerful and adroit in their negotiation of a seeming totality of human experience, Donnelly confronts--from a contemporary vantage--the clutter (and devastation) that civilization has left us with, enlisting agents as far flung as Prometheus, Flaming Hot Cheetos, Jonah, NyQuil, and Alexander the Great.
by Mary Ruefle
 
Through her many projects across numerous genres, Mary Ruefle has proven herself a singular artist, drawing many fans from around the world to her unique vision. With Dunce she returns to the practice that has always been at her core: the making of poems. With her startlingly fresh sensibility, she enraptures us in poem after poem by the intensity of her attention, with the imaginative flourishes of her being-in-the-world, which is always deep with mysteries, unexpected appearances, and abiding yearning. Dunce has been longlisted for the 2019 National Book Awards.
edited by Major Jackson
 
The state of the world has inspired many to write poetry, and to read it—to share all the rage, beauty, and every other thing under the sun in the way that only poetry can. Now the foremost anthology of contemporary American poetry returns, guest edited by Harvard Review poetry editor Major Jackson, who "makes poems that rumble and rock" (poet Dorianne Laux). This 2019 edition includes some of the year's most defining, striking, and innovative poems and poets, including: Li-Young Lee, Ada Limón, Ocean Vuong, Kevin Young, and many others.
 
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