March 2020: Author Readings, First Friday, Indie Next, and New in Gardening!

March 2020: Author Readings, First Friday, Indie Next, and New in Gardening!
 
Find out which authors are reading soon, check out our First Friday giveaways, get a sampling of Indie Next titles, and learn what's new in Gardening. But first....
 
New Releases
 
These books are among the biggest new and upcoming releases!
by Erik Larson
Out Now!
 
Larson shows, in cinematic detail, how Churchill taught the British people "the art of being fearless." It is a story of political brinkmanship, but it’s also an intimate domestic drama, set against the backdrop of Churchill's prime-ministerial country home, Chequers; his wartime retreat, Ditchley, where he and his entourage go when the moon is brightest and the bombing threat is highest; and of course 10 Downing Street in London. Drawing on diaries, original archival documents, and once-secret intelligence reports—some released only recently—Larson provides a new lens on London’s darkest year through the day-to-day experience of Churchill and his family: his wife, Clementine; their youngest daughter, Mary, who chafes against her parents' wartime protectiveness; their son, Randolph, and his beautiful, unhappy wife, Pamela; Pamela's illicit lover, a dashing American emissary; and the advisers in Churchill’s "Secret Circle," to whom he turns in the hardest moments. Order Your Copy!
by Hilary Mantel
Out: March 10
 
With The Mirror & the Light, Hilary Mantel brings to a triumphant close the trilogy she began with Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. She traces the final years of Thomas Cromwell, the boy from nowhere who climbs to the heights of power, offering a defining portrait of predator and prey, of a ferocious contest between present and past, between royal will and a common man's vision: of a modern nation making itself through conflict, passion and courage. Eagerly awaited and eight years in the making, The Mirror & the Light completes Cromwell's journey from self-made man to one of the most feared, influential figures of his time. Portrayed by Mantel with pathos and terrific energy, Cromwell is as complex as he is unforgettable: a politician and a fixer, a husband and a father, a man who both defied and defined his age. Preorder Your Copy!
by N. K. Jemisin
Out: March 24
 
Five New Yorkers must come together to defend their city from an ancient evil in this stunning new novel. Every great city has a soul. Some are as ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York City? She's got six. But every city also has a dark side. A roiling, ancient evil stirs in the halls of power, threatening to destroy the city and her six newborn avatars unless they can come together and stop it once and for all. Preorder Your Copy!
 
First Friday
 
On March 6, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
One lucky adult will win:
 
by Brian Doyle
 
When Brian Doyle passed away at the age of sixty after a bout with brain cancer, he left behind a cult-like following of devoted readers who regard his writing as one of the best-kept secrets of the twenty-first century. Doyle writes with a delightful sense of wonder about the sanctity of everyday things, and about love and connection in all their forms: spiritual love, brotherly love, romantic love, and even the love of a nine-foot sturgeon. A life's work, One Long River of Song invites readers to experience joy and wonder in ordinary moments that become, under Doyle's rapturous and exuberant gaze, extraordinary. [Please note: this giveaway copy is missing its dust jacket.]
And our kids prize is:
 
by Dave Matthews
 
Kirra, a curious, agile, and outgoing girl, lives in an idyllic community hidden inside a dormant volcano. She and her father are the only two people allowed to venture beyond its walls. Kirra is in training to become a Storyteller like him, and together they travel from village to village spreading fearsome tales designed to keep outsiders away from their secret nest. One day, after hearing rumors of strangers called the "Takers," Kirra leaves the volcano by herself, hoping to discover her own story. But she unknowingly leads the Takers back to her doorstep, and they rob her of everything she has ever held dear. This Middle Grade novel is about overcoming loss, embracing community, and living in harmony with nature. This special edition comes in a wooden box and is paired with a small live succulent!
 
Indie Next
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for March 2020.
by Colum McCann
 
"This is a towering, breathtaking, sweeping work of poetic and technical brilliance. Although much of Apeirogon resides in the current and past state of Israeli-Palestinian relations, the novel demonstrates how each person, each story, in this ultimately small section of the world represents but one point of an infinitely sided shape—how between all of us, even those locked in seemingly irreconcilable conflict, there pulses a vital connectivity, a path to understanding, forgiveness, and compassion." —Ben Newgard, Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill, NC Order Your Copy!
by James McBride
 
"Deacon King Kong is a quintessential New York story. Set in the Brooklyn projects in 1969, a perpetually inebriated deacon called Sportcoat aims a gun at the neighborhood’s main drug dealer in the public plaza and pulls the trigger. Incredibly well-constructed and hilarious at times, McBride’s story entwines a number of storylines that are kickstarted by this central event. The local Italian gangster, the veteran cop, the meddling churchgoers, and the drug pushers all have their own agendas, hopes, and dreams that are affected. And though Sportcoat doesn’t remember his actions and is always under the influence of gut-rot moonshine, I couldn’t help but root for him as I was reading this. His delightful ineptitude and absence of clarity made this book impossible for me to put down. If you’ve never read McBride before, this is a great introduction." —Stuart McCommon, Novel., Memphis, TN Order Your Copy!
by Michael Christie
 
"Trees: They provide shelter, sustenance, and sanctuary for vast numbers of creatures. They create the very air we breathe. And they are under threat. For generations, the Greenwood family lives with, destroys, fights for, and monetizes these gentle giants until their very existence is absorbed into the class system designed and upheld by the one percent. This is a sweeping arboreal saga full of blood, greed, heart, and humanity. Greenwood will fell readers worldwide." —Bex Petterson, Bloomsbury Books, Ashland, OR Order Your Copy!
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Lisa See
 
"Off the southern coast of the Korean Peninsula, Jeju Island is home to generations of haenyo—women who take their living from both land and sea and call the shots in their matriarchal society. Young-sook and Mi-ja are best friends in the 1930s, learning to dive with their all-female collective while their island suffers under Japanese colonialism. Lisa See follows them as they grow up under Japanese rule, into WWII, to the Korean War and its devastating aftermath, and into the 21st century. The Island of Sea Women is not only a story of friendship found, lost, and found again, but also a richly detailed picture of a unique culture of women in a world spinning out of control. Amazing detail and presence." — Janet Rhodes, BookPeople of Moscow, Moscow, ID Order Your Copy!
by G. Willow Wilson
 
"Fatima is a concubine of the sultan of the last emirate in the Iberian Peninsula to submit to the Spanish Inquisition. When her dearest friend, Hassan, a mapmaker who can map places he has never seen (and that do not always exist), is singled out by the Inquisition, she flees with him and a jinn, following the trail of the elusive and mythical Bird King, who may or may not be able to grant them sanctuary. Wilson’s latest novel is rich with the historical detail, lush description, and fantastical elements that we have come to know and love from her. A story of resistance, freedom, seeking, and strength, and a true fable for our times." — Anna Eklund, University Book Store, Seattle, WA Order Your Copy!
 
Upcoming Author Readings
Tuesday, March 10, 7pm
 
This reading is in celebration of International Women's Day. Cindy Williams Gutiérrez's new poetry collection, Inlay with Nacre, is herstory--the plight of Woman as bride, wife, mother, and daughter--and a call to action to restore the Feminine in the world. Portland writer Kate Gray's new poetry collection, For Every Girl, is a love song to and celebration of the girl, the queer, the survivor in all of us. Gemma Whelan will be reading from Kissing the Witch by Emma Donahue. She is producing the play of the same name, which will be produced by Corrib, in April of 2020. More Info on Our Website
Worse Than Weird
Wednesday, March 11, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes back Portland children's author Jody Little, to read from Worse Than Weird. Readers who love Leslie Connor and Ann M. Martin will adore this story of a citywide scavenger hunt and a girl who learns that family—and weirdness—is relative. Hoping to ditch two months of chicken coops, kale, and her parents’ antiscreen rules, Mac MacLeod sets out to win a citywide food cart scavenger hunt and the money she needs for the summer coding camp of her dreams. But Mac discovers more than just clues during her cross-city sprint—like how her weird parents might not be the worst thing compared to the circumstances of those around her. With the same humor and hope of her debut novel, Mostly the Honest Truth, Jody J. Little gives readers another spunky, unforgettable character to root for. More Info on Our Website
Thursday, March 12, 7pm
 
Los Angeles author Katharine Coldiron presents Ceremonials, a twelve-part lyric novella inspired by Florence + the Machine's 2011 album of the same name. It's the story of two girls, Amelia and Corisande, who fall in love at a boarding school. Corisande dies suddenly on the eve of graduation, but Amelia cannot shake her ghost. A narrative about obsession, the Minotaur, and the veil between life and death, Ceremonials is a poem in prose, a keening in words, and a song etched in ink. In Portland author Jackie Shannon Hollis's memoir, This Particular Happiness: A Childless Love Story, she explores what it really means to choose a different path, delving into the messy and beautiful territory of what we keep and what we abandon to make the space for love. Portland author Claire Rudy Foster's new book, Shine of the Ever, is a literary mix tape of queer voices out of 1990s Portland. By turns tender and punk-tough, fierce and loving, this collection of short stories explores what binds a community of queer and trans people as they negotiate love, screwing up and learning to forgive themselves for being young and sometimes foolish. More Info on Our Website
A Reasonable Doubt
Monday, March 16, 7pm
 
Portland thriller writer Phillip Margolin's latest, A Reasonable Doubt, is the third in his Robin Lockwood series. Former MMA fighter and Yale Law graduate Robin Lockwood is a young criminal defense attorney and partner in a prominent law firm in Portland, Oregon. Professional magician Robert Chesterfield is seeking help in acquiring patent protection for an illusion. This is out of the scope of the law firm’s expertise, but when Robin Lockwood looks into his previous relationship with the firm, she learns that twenty years ago he was arrested for two murders, one attempted murder, and was involved in the potentially suspicious death of his very rich wife. Now, decades later, he debuts his new trick—only to disappear at the end. He's a man with more than one dark past and many enemies—is his disappearance tied to one of the many people who have good reason to hate him? Was he killed and his body disposed of, or did he use his considerable skills to engineer his own disappearance? Robin Lockwood must unravel the tangled skein of murder and bloody mischief to learn how it all ties together. More Info on Our Website
Willa's Grove
Tuesday, March 17, 7pm
 
The Montana author's new novel is Willa's Grove. Willa Silvester is reeling from the untimely death of her beloved husband and the reality that she must say goodbye to the small mountain town they founded together. Yet as Willa mourns her losses, an impossible question keeps staring her in the face: So now what? Struggling to find the answer alone, fiercely independent Willa eventually calls a childhood friend who happens to be in her own world of hurt--and that's where the idea sparks. They decide to host a weeklong interlude from life, and invite two other friends facing their own quandaries. Soon the four women converge at Willa's Montana homestead, a place where they can learn from nature and one another as they contemplate their second acts together in the rugged wilderness of big sky country. More Info on Our Website
Oregon Authors
Monday, March 23, 7pm
 
The characters in Cai Emmons's Vanishing: Stories operate in a world in which their voices are not heard, and are navigating prickly paths, doing what they can to survive. The lives of the five women in these stories speak to the difficulty of honing a strong identity in a culture that consistently devalues women. Tammy Lynne Stoner's Sugar Land is a southern fried novel about love, Lead Belly, and liberation. It's 1923 in Midland, Texas, and Miss Dara falls in love with her best friend―who also happens to be a girl. Sugar Land is a triumphant, beautiful novel about the heart's refusal to be denied what the heart wants. More Info on Our Website
Poetry Reading
Tuesday, March 24, 7pm
 
In Mercy, local poet Judith Montgomery chronicles the story of caring for her a husband as he endures cancer treatment. Though brutal in its technology, the medical world Montgomery describes is merciful in its human form. Anyone who has had even the least brush with cancer will find here an honest and hopeful world. Pansies, Oregon poet Carol Barrett's collection of thirty slight, delicate vignettes, recounts her experience of the Apostolic Lutheran community through the lens of the young, Apostolic woman, Abigail, who babysits for her daughter. Each brief yet intimate piece housed within this collection renders the indelible bond formed between Abigail and the narrator's daughter with grace and wonder. Pansies is a finalist for the Oregon Book Award! More Info on Our Wesbite
Poetry Reading
Thursday, March 26, 7pm
 
The Hardy Tree is Washington poet Linda Bierds's latest collection. Focusing on figures such as Thomas Hardy, Alan Turing, Virginia Woolf, and the World War One poets, The Hardy Tree examines power, oppression and individual rights in ways that reverberate through our lives today. Uniting these themes is the issue of communication—the various methods and codes we use to reach one another. Backed by Bierds' intensive research and woven with scientific evidence, she pushes us to consider our futures in direct conversation with the past. Republic Cafe is the latest collection from Portland poet David Biespiel. This is a meditative, poetic journal about love during a time of violence. The book is a tally of what appears and disappears in every moment. Mindful of epigenetic experience as our bodies become living vessels for history's tragedies, David Biespiel praises not only the essentialness of human memory, but also the sanctity of our flawed, human forgetting. More Info on Our Website
 
New in Gardening
by Piet Oudolf and Henk Gerritsen
 
The original publication of Planting the Natural Garden ushered in a revolution in landscape design: the New Perennial Movement. Now this classic has been expanded and updated to include scores of new plants and combinations. Packed with practical information and visual inspiration, Planting the Natural Garden zeroes in on the New Perennial Movement's power to move us, making its distinctive plant palette available to all. For enthusiasts of these vibrant landscapes, it is an essential text; for gardeners who love the dreamy moods and colors that Oudolf and Gerritsen celebrate, it's the key to a magic kingdom of garden beauty.
by Naoko Abe
 
Each year, the flowering of cherry blossoms marks the beginning of spring. But if it weren't for the pioneering work of an English eccentric, Collingwood "Cherry" Ingram, Japan’s beloved cherry blossoms could have gone extinct. Ingram first fell in love with the sakura, or cherry tree, when he visited Japan on his honeymoon in 1907 and was so taken with the plant that he brought back hundreds of cuttings with him to England. Years later, upon learning that the Great White Cherry had virtually disappeared from Japan, he buried a living cutting from his own collection in a potato and repatriated it via the Trans-Siberian Express. In the years that followed, Ingram sent more than 100 varieties of cherry tree to new homes around the globe. As much a history of the cherry blossom in Japan as it is the story of one remarkable man, The Sakura Obsession follows the flower from its significance as a symbol of the imperial court, through the dark days of the Second World War, and up to the present-day worldwide fascination with this iconic blossom.
by Melissa Raupach and Felix Lill
 
No need to keep buying the same vegetables you eat all the time over and over again. Regrow Your Veggies is an insightful guide that provides effective propagation techniques to recycle and regrow more than 20 popular vegetables right at home. Learn how to have a source of fresh and healthy vegetables close by, from onions and sweet potatoes to pineapples and mangoes, reduce waste, and know how to prevent and solve issues with pesky pests and pathogens. Get the most out of your favorite foods and produce your own produce.
by Diane Miessler
 
Growing awareness of the importance of soil health means that microbes are on the minds of even the most casual gardeners. After all, anyone who has ever attempted to plant a thriving patch of flowers or vegetables knows that what you grow is only as good as the soil you grow it in. It is possible to create and maintain rich, dark, crumbly soil that's teeming with life, using very few inputs and a no-till, no-fertilizer approach. Certified permaculture designer and lifelong gardener Diane Miessler presents the science of soil health in an engaging, entertaining voice geared for the backyard grower. She shares the techniques she has used — including cover crops, constant mulching, and a simple-but-supercharged recipe for compost tea — to transform her own landscape from a roadside dump for broken asphalt to a garden that stops traffic, starting from the ground up.
 
Street Books
 
Street Books is a bicycle-powered mobile library, serving people who live outside. Street Books strives to empower people on the streets through access to literature and create a community of support for people living outside, through a shared love of books. Annie Bloom's Books is partnering with Street Books by offering 10% off books purchased for their wish list. To view that wish list and to find out more about Street Books, please see: Our Street Books Page
 
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Annie Bloom's is now on Bookshop. Bookshop is an online bookstore with a mission to financially support independent bookstores and give back to the book community. Check out Annie Bloom's online storefront at Bookshop!
 
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