March 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New in Performing Arts

March 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New in Performing Arts
 
Find out which authors are reading here soon, check out the latest selections from indie booksellers across the country, and see what's new in our Performing Arts section. But first....
 
Upcoming Releases
 
These books are among the most anticipated new releases in the coming weeks. Click on a cover or title to pre-order from our website.
by Donna Leon
Out: March 5th
 
What seems innocent on the Venetian surface can cause tsunamis beneath. Gonzalo Rodriguez de Tejada unexpectedly, and literally, drops dead on the street, and one of his friends just arrived in Venice for the memorial service, is strangled in her hotel room. Now with an urgent case to solve, Brunetti reluctantly untangles the long-hidden mystery in Gonzalo's life that ultimately led to murder--a resolution that brings him way more pain than satisfaction. Once again, Donna Leon brilliantly plumbs the twists and turns of the human condition, reuniting us with some of crime fiction's most memorable and enduring characters.
by Laurie Halse Anderson
Out: March 12th
 
Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she's never written about before. Searing and soul-searching, this important memoir is a denouncement of our society's failures and a love letter to all the people with the courage to say #MeToo and #TimesUp, whether aloud, online, or only in their own hearts. Shout speaks truth to power in a loud, clear voice-- and once you hear it, it is impossible to ignore.
by Edward O. Wilson
Out: March 19th
 
Asserting that religious creeds and philosophical questions can be reduced to purely genetic and evolutionary components, and that the human body and mind have a physical base obedient to the laws of physics and chemistry, Genesis demonstrates that the only way for us to fully understand human behavior is to study the evolutionary histories of nonhuman species. Of these, Wilson demonstrates that at least seventeen--among them the African naked mole rat and the sponge-dwelling shrimp--have been found to have advanced societies based on altruism and cooperation. Genesis is a pithy yet path-breaking work of evolutionary theory, braiding twenty-first-century scientific theory with the lyrical biological and humanistic observations for which Wilson is known.
by Jacqueline Winspear
Out: March 26
 
When Catherine Saxon, an American correspondent reporting on the war in Europe, is found murdered in her London digs, news of her death is concealed by British authorities. Serving as a linchpin between Scotland Yard and the Secret Service, Robert MacFarlane pays a visit to Maisie Dobbs, seeking her help. He is accompanied by an agent from the US Department of Justice—Mark Scott, the American who helped Maisie escape Hitler’s Munich in 1938. MacFarlane asks Maisie to work with Scott to uncover the truth about Saxon’s death. As the Germans unleash the full terror of their blitzkrieg upon the British Isles, raining death and destruction from the skies, Maisie must balance the demands of solving this dangerous case with her need to protect Anna, the young evacuee she has grown to love and wants to adopt. Entangled in an investigation linked to the power of wartime propaganda and American political intrigue being played out in Britain, Maisie will face losing her dearest friend—and the possibility that she might be falling in love again.
 
First Friday
 
On March 1, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
 
One lucky adult will win:
by Hiro Arikawa
 
With simple yet descriptive prose, this novel gives voice to Nana the cat and his owner, Satoru, as they take to the road on a journey with no other purpose than to visit three of Satoru's longtime friends. Or so Nana is led to believe... With his crooked tail--a sign of good fortune--and adventurous spirit, Nana is the perfect companion for the man who took him in as a stray. And as they travel in a silver van across Japan, with its ever-changing scenery and seasons, they will learn the true meaning of courage and gratitude, of loyalty and love.
 
And our kids prize is:
by Sophie Blackall
 
Winner of the 2019 Caldecott Medal! Watch the days and seasons pass as the wind blows, the fog rolls in, and icebergs drift by. Outside, there is water all around. Inside, the daily life of a lighthouse keeper and his family unfolds as the keeper boils water for tea, lights the lamp's wick, and writes every detail in his logbook. Step back in time and through the door of this iconic lighthouse into a cozy dollhouse-like interior with the extraordinary award-winning artist Sophie Blackall.
 
Upcoming Author Readings
Middle Grade Reading
TONIGHT!
Thursday, February 28, 7pm
 
Deborah Hopkinson's How I Became a Spy is a story of espionage, survival, and friendship during World War II. Bertie Bradshaw never set out to become a spy. He certainly never expected that a strong-willed American girl named Eleanor would play Watson to his Holmes (or Holmes to his Watson, depending on who you ask). But when a young woman goes missing, leaving behind a coded notebook, Bertie is determined to solve the mystery. Portland author Molly Gloss's classic dystopian fantasy novel, Outside the Gates, has just been reissued. Thirty years later, it's as timely, poignant, and stirring as ever. Portland's own Carmen Bernier-Grand's middle grade novel, In the Shade of the Nispero Tree, is about a Puerto Rican girl named Tere is caught between caught between the two worlds of her school friends and her mother's dream of Tere going to a fancy private school.
Book Signing Only!
Monday, March 4, 5:30-7:00pm
 
The local author will be signing copies of her new book, Mastering the Business of Organizing. Anne M. Blumer, CPO(R), owner and founder of SolutionsForYou Inc. and the Institute for Professional Organizers(TM), has trained hundreds of professional organizers from 17 countries, and in this guide, she explores how to turn your love of organizing into a full-fledged career. Mastering the Business of Organizing is an essential guide for professional organizers and productivity consultants, and it advances the message and vision of the National Association of Productivity & Organizing Professionals.
St. Nicholas Salvage & Wrecking
Tuesday, March 5, 7pm
 
Join us for the Portland thriller author's launch of his latest novel. Michael Patrick Finnigan was a New York City cop and a US Marshal. Katalin Fiero Dahar was a soldier, spy, and assassin for Spain. Together, they created St. Nicholas Salvage & Wrecking, a largely illegal bounty hunting operation based in Cyprus and working throughout Europe. Someone is kidnapping Middle Eastern refugee children as they flee war-torn countries and selling them into prostitution around the world. Finnigan and Fiero get the assignment to track them down and save the refugees. The battle to stop the mass kidnappings ranges from Belgrade and Zagreb, to the Loire Valley and Milan, and to the plains of Kosovo. As Finnigan and Fiero close in, the conspirators realize that the judge of the ICC is the real threat and plan an assassination. Now the partners have to save their patron and the kidnapped refugees from a rogue military force with nothing left to lose.
The Perfect Alibi
Wednesday, March 6, 7pm
 
The Portland mystery author returns to Annie Bloom's for the launch of his latest book. Robin Lockwood is a young lawyer with a prestigious small law firm and a former MMA fighter who helped pay for Yale Law School with her bouts. She is representing a rape victim for her civil lawsuit against her rapist. At the same time, another client is up on a murder charge—one that should be dismissed as self-defense—but the D.A. trying the case is determined to bring it to trial. Now she has to mastermind two impossible cases, trying to find the hidden truth that links the two of them. Phillip Margolin, the master of the legal thriller, returns in one of his twistiest, most compelling crime novels yet.
Flamingo Lane
Thursday, March 7, 7pm
 
We welcome back the local author to read from his latest novel of Southern noir. Chance is a hitman with hippie roots and deep emotional wounds, disillusioned by life and stung by love--and his next target is the woman who rejected him. But, as he closes in on his victim, Chance struggles to rediscover the competitive edge that normally makes him so deadly. Faye Lindstrom escaped a life of captivity and addiction in Quintana Roo, but she can't flee the woman she has become. For now, she holes up in a house in Crooked River owned by an old friend, hoping that the violence in her past doesn't catch up to her. Flamingo Lane is a gritty cat-and-mouse pursuit that launches from an island off the Yucatan Peninsula through the cornfields of Indiana to a small town on the Florida panhandle.
Reading
Monday, March 11, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes Portland writers Elizabeth Beechwood, Sydney Culpepper, Chloe Hageman, Julia Figliotti, Debby Dodds, LeeAnn McLennan, Tonya Lippert, and Lizzy Carney to read from their contributions to Strongly Worded Women, an anthology of 18 short stories by women authors from across the country. Back in 2015, Oregon press Not a Pipe Publishing announced they were accepting author Kamila Shamsie’s challenge to the publishing industry to only publish women authors in 2018. After publishing eight novels by seven women authors in 2018, they capped off their Year of Publishing Women with an anthology of 18 short stories by women authors from across the country.
Mostly the Honest Truth
Tuesday, March 12, 7pm
 
Join us for the launch of Portland author and third-grade teacher Jody J. Little's middle grade book, Mostly the Honest Truth. After Pop is sent back to rehab, Jane Pengilly arrives at her newest foster home determined to stick to the straight and narrow and get back to her beloved dad as soon as she can. It’s not the first time they’ve been apart, but Jane’s determined it will be the last. Twelve days out in the boonies of Three Boulders makes Jane miss Pop more than ever. But as the days go by, she realizes that family is more than who you’re related to—and that a home can be found in the unlikeliest of places. This tough yet tender debut is a pitch-perfect story exploring the many meanings of family.
Reading
Monday, March 18, 7pm
 
Pacific Northwest authors Vlautin and Evison will read from the paperback editions of their latest novels. In Willy Vlautin's Don't Skip Out on Me, Horace Hopper is a half-Paiute, half-Irish ranch hand who wants to be somebody. He's spent most of his life on the ranch of his kindly guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Reese. But, while the Reeses treat him like a son, Horace decides to leave the only loving home he's known to prove his worth by training to become a boxer. Mr. Reese is holding on to a way of life that is no longer sustainable. He's a seventy-two-year-old rancher with a bad back. He's not sure how he'll keep things going without Horace, but he knows the boy must find his own way. In Jonathan Evison's Lawn Boy, Mike Muñoz is a young Chicano living in Washington State. Not too many years out of high school and still doing menial work—and just fired from his latest gig as a lawn boy on a landscaping crew—he knows that he's got to be the one to shake things up if he's ever going to change his life. But how? Lawn Boy is an important, entertaining, and completely winning novel about social class distinctions, about overcoming cultural discrimination, and about standing up for oneself.
La Luministe
Thursday, March 21, 7pm
 
The local author reads from her debut novel. Berthe Morisot was a fist in a velvet glove. In 19th century Paris, an haute-bourgeois woman was expected to be discreet to the point of near-invisibility. But Berthe, forbidden to enter L'Ecole des Beaux Arts, started the art movement that broke open the walls of the art establishment. And, unable to marry the love of her life, Edouard Manet, she married his brother. While she epitomized femininity and decorum, Morisot was a quiet revolutionary. As an Impressionist, she created light-infused paintings of women in reverie that the other members of the group deemed the most avant-garde of them all. They called Morisot La Luministe, the painter of light. Her portraits depict women lost in thought, not as objects of the male gaze, but possessing an interior life.
Nina LaCour, Shanthi Sekaran, Zahra Noorbakhsk, Vernon Keeve, and Laura Davis
Thursday, March 28, 7pm
 
Annie Bloom's welcomes Nina LaCour, Shanthi Sekaran, Zahra Noorbakhsk, Vernon Keeve, and Laura Davis. With Border Crossing, these five authors share fiction, poetry, and comedy that explore the boundaries of where creativity can take us. Nina LaCour is the winner of the 2018 Michael L. Printz Award and nationally bestselling author of We Are Okay. Shanthi Sekaran is the author of Lucky Boy, an NPR Best Book of 2017. Zahra Noorbakhsh is a comedian, writer, cohost of #GoodMuslimBadMuslim, and deemed a “must-listen” by O, The Oprah Magazine. Vernon Keeve III is a poet, teacher, and author of Southern Migrant Mixtape. Laura Joyce Davis is a fiction writer, Fulbright scholar, and winner of Poets & Writers Exchange Award.
 
March 2019 Indie Next Picks
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for March 2019.
by Kate Quinn
 
"A Russian night witch and a British war correspondent turned Nazi hunter join forces to track a ruthless assassin in The Huntress, the latest book by Kate Quinn. From the pre-war wilds of the Soviet Union to the streets of a war-torn Germany to the bustle of Boston, Quinn masterfully mixes the past with a post-war present, and it’s phenomenal. Fans of The Alice Network and The Nightingale will love this fantastically fast-paced and utterly exhilarating historical fiction." —Kristin Bates, McLean & Eakin Booksellers, Petoskey, MI
by Taylor Jenkins Reid
 
"Oh man, what a ride! I guess I'm the right demographic for this book: I love rock and I grew up in the '70s, so I wanted to like it...instead, I loved it! Yes, it's sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll, but it's also got wonderfully complex characters that I cared about even if I didn't like how they acted. It's a peek into the formation of a band, how the music is made, the struggles of addiction and clashing personalities, and, ultimately, love. The story is compiled of pieces of interviews with the band and those connected to them — a very effective technique that made the novel's pages turn even faster. Taylor Jenkins Reid's Daisy Jones & the Six is one of my favorite books of 2019 so far!" —Serena Wyckoff, Copperfish Books, Punta Gorda, FL
by Anissa Gray
 
"For lovers of An American Marriage comes a thoughtful debut about family, secrets, and the damage one's choices can cause to those you love. Told from many perspectives within one complex family, this novel tugged at me from all angles. I found myself understanding and empathizing with all the characters at different times, even though their choices and the consequences of those choices were vastly in contrast to one another. A very strong debut." —Jamie Southern, Bookmarks, Winston-Salem, NC
by Peter Heller
 
"Peter Heller can take you on a journey through nature like no other writer. The River is the story of two close friends wanting nothing more than to enjoy their time together on a trip through the Canadian wilderness, and fly fishing has never been so beautifully portrayed nor has the serenity of water and nature. But the peacefulness slowly wanes and the tension begins to build as the trip becomes a race against encroaching forest fires and an attempt to save the life of the mysterious woman they have picked up along the way. Heller has created a story of friendship and survival that should not be missed." —Mary McBride, Rainy Day Books, Fairway, KS
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Julian Barnes
 
"The Only Story, a love story that captivated me from the very first page, tells of Paul, a young man who at the age of 19 falls in love with a woman almost 30 years his senior. Now in the sunset of his life, Paul looks back with tenderness on the life they had together, how everything fell apart, and how his life evolved as a result. I loved the author's reflections on love and found myself savoring his words, not wanting the book to end. A beautiful story from a superb writer."
— Danielle Bauter, Laguna Beach Books, Laguna, CA
by Chloe Benjamin
 
"In 1969, four siblings visit a fortune teller, who tells each child the date of their death. We follow the Gold siblings both separately and together over the next four decades and see how these revelations affect their choices, their behavior, and their relationships with one another. Apart from raising the obvious question (would you want to know the date of your death?), Benjamin brilliantly explores how family members can be both close to and distant from one another, and ponders the point at which our actions cease to matter and fate steps in. I LOVED The Immortalists, and if there's any justice in bookselling, this book will find the massive audience it so deserves."
— Erika VanDam, RoscoeBooks, Chicago, IL
 
New in Performing Arts
 
Here are some of the latest books on Music, Film, and TV:
by Ian S. Port
 
The Birth of Loud is a riveting saga in the history of rock 'n' roll: the decades-long rivalry between the two men who innovated the electric guitar's amplified sound—Leo Fender and Les Paul—and their intense competition to convince rock stars like the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, and Eric Clapton to play the instruments they built. While Fender was a quiet, half-blind, self-taught radio repairman from rural Orange County, Paul was a brilliant but egomaniacal pop star and guitarist who spent years toying with new musical technologies. Their contest turned into an arms race as the most inventive musicians of the 1950s and 1960s—including bluesman Muddy Waters, rocker Buddy Holly, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and Eric Clapton—adopted one maker's guitar or another. By the time Jimi Hendrix played "The Star-Spangled Banner" at Woodstock in 1969 on his Fender Stratocaster, it was clear that electric instruments—Fender or Gibson—had launched music into a radical new age, empowering artists with a vibrancy and volume never before attainable.
by Lili Anolik
 
Eve Babitz spent the 1960s rocking and rolling on the Sunset Strip, honing her notoriety. There were the album covers she designed: for Buffalo Springfield and the Byrds, to name but a few. There were the men she seduced: Jim Morrison, Ed Ruscha, Harrison Ford, to name but a very few. Then, at nearly thirty, her It girl days numbered, Babitz was discovered—as a writer—by Joan Didion. She would go on to produce seven books. Under-known and under-read during her career, she’s since experienced a breakthrough. Now in her mid-seventies, she’s on the cusp of literary stardom and recognition as an essential LA writer. In the '90s, a freak fire turned Babitz into a recluse, living in a condo in West Hollywood, where Lili Anolik tracked her down in 2012. Anolik’s elegant and provocative new book is equal parts biography and detective story. It is also on dangerously intimate terms with its subject: artist, writer, muse, and one-woman zeitgeist, Eve Babitz.
by Jeff Tweedy
 
Few bands have inspired as much devotion as the Chicago rock band Wilco, and it's thanks, in large part, to the band's singer, songwriter, and guiding light: Jeff Tweedy. But while his songs and music have been endlessly discussed and analyzed, Jeff has rarely talked so directly about himself, his life, and his artistic process. In his long-awaited memoir, Jeff will tell stories about his childhood in Belleville, Illinois; the St. Louis record store, rock clubs, and live-music circuit that sparked his songwriting and performing career; and the Chicago scene that brought it all together. He'll also talk in-depth about his collaborators in Uncle Tupelo, Wilco, and more; and write lovingly about his parents, wife Susie, and sons, Spencer and Sammy. Honest, funny, and disarming, Tweedy's memoir will bring readers inside both his life and his musical process, illuminating his singular genius and sharing his story, voice, and perspective for the first time.
by Charlie Brooker
 
What becomes of humanity when it's fed into the jaws of a hungry new digital machine? Discover the world of Black Mirror in this immersive, illustrated, oral history. This first official book logs the entire Black Mirror journey, from its origins in creator Charlie Brooker's mind to its current status as one of the biggest cult TV shows to emerge from the UK. Alongside a collection of astonishing behind-the-scenes imagery and ephemera, Brooker and producer Annabel Jones will detail the creative genesis, inspiration, and thought process behind each film for the first time, while key actors, directors and other creative talents relive their own involvement.
 
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