January 2020: Author Readings, First Friday, Indie Next, and New in Psychology!

January 2020: Author Readings, First Friday, Indie Next, and New in Psychology!
 
Happy New Year! Find out which authors are reading soon, check out our First Friday giveaways, see which titles indie booksellers are loving, and discover what's new in Psychology. But first....
 
New Releases
 
These books are among the biggest new and upcoming releases!
by Brian Doyle
Out Now!
 
When Brian Doyle passed away at the age of sixty after a bout with brain cancer, he left behind a cult-like following of devoted readers who regard his writing as one of the best-kept secrets of the twenty-first century. Doyle writes with a delightful sense of wonder about the sanctity of everyday things, and about love and connection in all their forms: spiritual love, brotherly love, romantic love, and even the love of a nine-foot sturgeon. At a moment when the world can sometimes feel darker than ever, Doyle's writing, which constantly evokes the humor and even bliss that life affords, is a balm. His essays manage to find, again and again, exquisite beauty in the quotidian, whether it's the awe of a child the first time she hears a river, or a husband's whiskers that a grieving widow misses seeing in her sink every morning. Through Doyle's eyes, nothing is dull. Purchase on Our Website
by Dav Pilkey
Out Now!
 
In this eighth book in the Dog Man series, Petey the Cat is out of jail, and he has a brand-new lease on life. While Petey's reevaluated what matters most, Li'l Petey is struggling to find the good in the world. Can Petey and Dog Man stop fighting like cats and dogs long enough to put their paws together and work as a team? They need each other now more than ever--Li'l Petey (and the world) is counting on them! Purchase on Our Website
by Isabel Allende
Out: January 21
 
In the late 1930s, civil war grips Spain. When General Franco and his Fascists succeed in overthrowing the government, hundreds of thousands are forced to flee in a treacherous journey over the mountains to the French border. Among them is Roser, a pregnant young widow, who finds her life intertwined with that of Victor Dalmau, an army doctor and the brother of her deceased love. In order to survive, the two must unite in a marriage neither of them desires. Together with two thousand other refugees, they embark on the SS Winnipeg, a ship chartered by the poet Pablo Neruda, to Chile. Destined to witness the battle between freedom and repression as it plays out across the world, Roser and Victor will find that home might have been closer than they thought all along. Preorder on Our Website
by William Gibson
Out: January 21
 
Verity Jane, gifted app whisperer, takes a job as the beta tester for a new product: a digital assistant, accessed through a pair of ordinary-looking glasses. "Eunice," the disarmingly human AI in the glasses, manifests a face, a fragmentary past, and a canny grasp of combat strategy. Realizing that her cryptic new employers don't yet know how powerful and valuable Eunice is, Verity instinctively decides that it's best they don't. Meanwhile, a century ahead in London, in a different time line entirely, Wilf Netherton works amid plutocrats and plunderers, survivors of the slow and steady apocalypse known as the jackpot. His boss, the enigmatic Ainsley Lowbeer, can look into alternate pasts and nudge their ultimate directions. Verity and Eunice are her current project. Wilf can see what Verity and Eunice can't: their own version of the jackpot, just around the corner, and the roles they both may play in it. Preorder on Our Website
 
First Friday
 
On January 3, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
One lucky adult will win:
 
by Pendleton Woolen Mills
 
With the appeal of a Pendleton blanket—tactile materials and timeless design—and travel-ready pouches, this is the perfect game to bring along on any trip.
And our kids prize is:
 
by Irene Smit and Astrid van der Hulst
 
Brimming from cover to cover with projects and other paper surprises, The Kids' Book of Paper Love, from the editors of Flow magazine and books, is a bounty of a book that begs to be folded, cut up, collaged, doodled on, and shared.
 
Upcoming Author Readings
What She Was Wearing
Wednesday, January 8, 7pm
 
How long can you keep a dark secret before you become completely unraveled? In What She Was Wearing, Portland writer Sanders uses poetry, prose, and letters to tell her #MeToo story—one that has taken over 30 years to reveal. In this collection, Shawn shares her nightmare of being raped at a fraternity toga party, and examines the event from a variety of perspectives, including poems written from the viewpoint of her attackers; the toga she was wearing; homecoming years later; and even the moment she told her college-aged children. As Shawn’s story unfolds, the reader will come to understand how significant the aftermath of rape can be. For decades, she was "triggered" in the most unexpected ways and is just now recognizing how those triggers impacted her self-worth. More Info on Our Website
The Offline Dating Method
Thursday, January 9, 7pm
 
The modern dating process is a mess—but it hasn't changed your innate desire for love and human connection. So rather than add to the exhausting narrative about the perils of digital dating, author Camille Virginia created a refreshing and powerful solution for it. Portland author Camille Virginia draws upon her transformation from a shy girl with social anxiety to a confident woman who's been asked out by nearly 300 men (from the Denver airport to the greeting card aisle of a drug store) without ever going online or using a dating app. More Info on Our Website
Oregon Mystery Authors
Tuesday, January 14, 7pm
 
Crossroad is W.H. Cameron's latest mystery. In the Oregon high desert, Melisende Dulac's life takes an ominous turn when she comes upon a grisly multiple car wreck and three shattered bodies on an isolated road outside of town. Near the scene, Melisende trips over a fourth body, that of a newborn girl. When the victims' bodies are stolen from her family's mortuary, Melisende is branded suspect number one. As the shadows gather and the mystery deepens, she must race to find the truth—or be swallowed by the darkness. River Run is the latest mystery from J.S. James. Newly promoted sheriff's deputy Delia Chavez has worked hard to get where she is. But just a few days into her new job, Delia finds the body of a hunter washed up on the bank of the Willamette River missing his trigger finger. Soon, more bodies are found—all hunters without their trigger fingers. What starts off looking like a simple case of a ruthless vigilante quickly devolves into something much more complex. Facing evasive killers who stop at nothing to conceal their crimes, Delia must bring the criminals to justice because everyone knows, if you're not the predator, you're prey. More Info on Our Website
Poetry Reading
Wednesday, January 15, 7pm
 
The Hardy Tree is Washington poet Linda Bierds's latest collection. Focusing on figures such as Thomas Hardy, Alan Turing, Virginia Woolf, and the World War One poets, The Hardy Tree examines power, oppression and individual rights in ways that reverberate through our lives today. Uniting these themes is the issue of communication—the various methods and codes we use to reach one another. Backed by Bierds' intensive research and woven with scientific evidence, she pushes us to consider our futures in direct conversation with the past. Republic Cafe is the latest collection from Portland poet David Biespiel. This is a meditative, poetic journal about love during a time of violence. The book is a tally of what appears and disappears in every moment. Mindful of epigenetic experience as our bodies become living vessels for history's tragedies, David Biespiel praises not only the essentialness of human memory, but also the sanctity of our flawed, human forgetting. More Info on Our Website
Brian Doyle's One Long River of Song
Monday, January 20, 7pm
 
Join us for Mary Miller Doyle's reading from her late husband's essay collection. When Brian Doyle passed away at the age of sixty after a bout with brain cancer, he left behind a cult-like following of devoted readers who regard his writing as one of the best-kept secrets of the twenty-first century. Doyle writes with a delightful sense of wonder about the sanctity of everyday things, and about love and connection in all their forms: spiritual love, brotherly love, romantic love, and even the love of a nine-foot sturgeon. At a moment when the world can sometimes feel darker than ever, Doyle's writing, which constantly evokes the humor and even bliss that life affords, is a balm. His essays manage to find, again and again, exquisite beauty in the quotidian, whether it's the awe of a child the first time she hears a river, or a husband's whiskers that a grieving widow misses seeing in her sink every morning. Through Doyle's eyes, nothing is dull. More Info on Our Website
Poetry Reading
Thursday, January 23, 7pm
 
Emmett Wheatfall presents his latest poetry collection, Our Scarlet Blue Wounds. He shows us how the roots of love grow deep in the soil of sacrifice. He illustrates the intensely complex relationship between idealism and realism. His poems hurt in just the right way. And it's no small feat opening one's own racial and cultural wounds for the world to see. It takes courage. It takes trust that a country will recognize itself, and its complicity, in those wounds. And Wheatfall trusts us to witness along with him. He proves himself ready and willing, even eager, to, as the titular poem in this collection demands, "build a new world" together. John Sibley Williams's latest collection is Skin Memory. He will also read from 2019's As One Fire Consumes Another. A stark, visceral collection of free verse and prose poetry, Skin Memory scours a wild landscape haunted by personal tragedy and the cruel consequences of human acts in search of tenderness and regeneration. In this book of daring and introspection, Williams considers the capriciousness of youth, the terrifying loss of cultural identity and self-identity, and what it means to live in an imperfect world. He reveals each body as made up of all bodies, histories, and shared dreams of the future. More Info on Our Website
A Generous Nature
Wednesday, January 29, 7pm
 
Portland author Marcy Houle's A Generous Nature: Lives Transformed by Oregon offers profiles of twenty-one conservationists and activists who have made enduring contributions to the preservation of Oregon’s wild and natural places and its high quality of life. These stories speak to their courage, foresight, and actions—at times against great odds—to save places, enact legislation, and motivate others to cherish and protect the places that make Oregon unique. A Generous Nature is a crucial reminder of our individual and collective responsibility to stand for and defend the places, ideals, and laws that make Oregon a progressive model for the rest of the nation. More Info on Our Website
Northwest Memoirists
Thursday, January 30, 7pm
 
How do you live when all you can feel is pain? Rachel Carter lived a picture-perfect life—then Multiple Sclerosis caught up with her. After two years of rapid decline, Rachel found herself lying on the floor, writhing in agony, hoping to die. In Enduring the Cure, Rachel Carter shares how she overcame her struggle with the debilitating disease. It’s a story of pain, decline, an experimental treatment, and healing. In Sarah Coomber's memoir The Same Moon, the recently wed—and quickly divorced—twenty-four-year-old escapes the disappointments of her Minnesota life for a job teaching English in Japan. Her plan is to use the year to reflect, heal and figure out what to do with her wrecked life. The reality? Sarah finds herself the lone English speaker in an isolated rural area, where she is drawn into serving tea to her male coworkers, performing with a koto (zither) group, advocating for her female students and colleagues, and embarking on a controversial romance with a local salaryman. This isn't the Japan Sarah was seeking, but it just might be the Japan she needs. More Info on Our Website
 
Indie Next Picks
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for January 2020.
by Kiley Reid
 
"When I attempted to write a review for Such a Fun Age, I was at a loss for words. How could I encapsulate how Kiley Reid's startling debut perfectly captured what it means to be a woman? The societal pressure, the self-doubt, the perseverance, the constant comparison—all of it was perfectly represented through Reid's two wonderfully flawed and captivating leads. Follow Emira and Alix, two women on seemingly incongruous paths who find themselves searching for purpose and an authentic sense of self. Such a Fun Age tackles complex issues—race, gender, economic status, and the intersection of them all—yet remains accessible. You will not want to put this book down; when you do, you’ll be itching to pick it back up again." —Gennifer Eccles, Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill, NC Purchase on Our Website
by Liz Moore
 
"This story's power comes not just from its beautiful writing but the reality of its characters and the incisive nature of its setting. Liz Moore has created a masterpiece that exposes the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia, highlighting the vulnerability of its victims and the sheer scope of suffering it causes. From the first page, when the murder mystery begins, readers will suffer and rejoice with the novel's oh-so-human characters. The power of this story is a fire that will linger for a long time." —Hilary Kotecki, The Doylestown & Lahaska Bookshops, Doylestown, PA Purchase on Our Website
by Ada Calhoun
 
"I eagerly snatched this book up, hoping it would offer a magic cure-all for the 4:00 a.m. insomnia that plagues me on a regular basis. Instead, I found solace and comfort, if not in a full eight hours, in the fact that I wasn’t alone in staring into the dark in the middle of the night, brain on a carousel, getting pissed and feeling miserable. About most everything. It all makes sense now: I'm not an anomaly or a sleepless loner, I'm part of a larger pattern, a cycle created by the culture of a certain generation—Generation X. Why We Can't Sleep gives hope and validation and takes away some of the worry. Although this book is specific to Gen Xers, I think their Baby Boomer parents and their Millennial children will also benefit from reading this fascinating generational study." —Rani Birchfield, Front Street Books, Alpine, TX Purchase on Our Website
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Pam Houston
 
"I can't decide if Mineral County, Colorado, is a piece of heaven or if it's actually heaven. Either way, it is a wondrous Rocky Mountain paradise—a paradise beset by bitter cold, fires, and various degrees of hardship, but always exquisite beauty. Pam Houston has 120 acres of it, and readers get a glimpse of life and death on the ranch in this marvelous combination of memoir and nature writing. Both deeply personal and wide-reaching, Deep Creek is about the human capacity to feel grief and joy all at once for the ground beneath one's feet and the planet as a whole." — Stan Hynds, Northshire Saratoga, Saratoga Springs, NY Purchase on Our Website
by Brigid Kemmerer
 
"A Curse So Dark and Lonely is billed as a retelling of Beauty and the Beast but it is so much more than that. Yes, there is a cursed kingdom, a prince that turns into a monster, and a girl he hopes will love him and break the curse. But the girl is from modern D.C. and has cerebral palsy, which is part of her but does not define her, and she becomes a badass who completely changes the game. This book is nonstop action from the opening sentence to the last paragraph. I fell in love with all of the characters and the world they inhabit. I really, really hope there is a sequel, as I will be first in line to read it!" — Carrie Deming, The Dog Eared Book, Palmyra, New York Purchase on Our Website
 
New in Psychology
by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga
 
Already a Japanese bestseller, this eye-opening and accessible follow-up to The Courage to be Disliked shares the powerful teachings of Alfred Adler, one of the giants of 19th-century psychology, through another illuminating dialogue between the philosopher and the young man. Three years after their first conversation, the young man finds himself disillusioned and disappointed, convinced Adler's teachings only work in theory, not in practice. But through further discussions between the philosopher and the young man, they deepen their own understandings of Adler's powerful teachings, and learn the tools needed to apply Adler's teachings to the chaos of everyday life. Plainspoken yet profoundly moving, reading The Courage to Be Happy will light a torch with the power to illuminate your life and brighten the world as we know it. Discover the courage to choose happiness. Purchase on Our Website
by Felicia Day
 
In Embrace Your Weird, author, producer, actress, TV writer, and web series creator Felicia Day takes you on a journey to find, rekindle, or expand your creative passions. Including Felicia's personal stories and hard-won wisdom, Embrace Your Weird offers: entertaining and revelatory exercises that empower you to be fearless, so you can rediscover the things that bring you joy, and crack your imagination wide open; unique techniques to vanquish enemies of creativity, like anxiety, fear, procrastination, perfectionism, criticism, and jealousy; tips to cultivate a creative community; space to explore and get your neurons firing. Whether you enjoy writing, baking, painting, podcasting, playing music, or have yet to uncover your favorite creative outlet, Embrace Your Weird will help you unlock the power of self-expression. Get motivated. Get creative. Get weird. Purchase on Our Website
by Wendy Wood
 
We spend a shocking 43 percent of our day doing things without thinking about them. That means that almost half of our actions aren’t conscious choices but the result of our non-conscious mind nudging our body to act along learned behaviors. We do them by habit. And yet, whenever we want to change something about ourselves, we rely on willpower. And that is why almost all of us fail. But what if you could harness the extraordinary power of your unconscious mind, which already determines so much of what you do, to truly reach your goals? A potent mix of neuroscience, case studies, and experiments conducted in Wood's lab, Good Habits, Bad Habits is a comprehensive, accessible, and above all deeply practical book that will change the way you think about almost every aspect of your life. Her clear and incisive work shows why willpower alone is woefully inadequate when we’re working toward building the life we truly want, and offers real hope for those who want to make positive change. Purchase on Our Website
by Kate Murphy
Out: January 7
 
Despite living in a world where technology allows constant digital communication and opportunities to connect, it seems no one is really listening or even knows how. And it's making us lonelier, more isolated, and less tolerant than ever before. A listener by trade, New York Times contributor Kate Murphy wanted to know how we got here. In this always illuminating and often humorous deep dive, Murphy explains why we're not listening, what it's doing to us, and how we can reverse the trend. She makes accessible the psychology, neuroscience, and sociology of listening while also introducing us to some of the best listeners out there (including a CIA agent, focus group moderator, bartender, radio producer, and top furniture salesman). Equal parts cultural observation, scientific exploration, and rousing call to action that's full of practical advice, You're Not Listening is to listening what Susan Cain's Quiet was to introversion. It's time to stop talking and start listening. Preorder on Our Website