January 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New in Mystery!

January 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next Picks, and New in Mystery!
 
Happy New Year! Find out which authors are reading here in January, read about January's Indie Next bookseller picks, and see what's new in Mystery. But first....
 
New Releases
 
These three books for kids are the big hits of the week. Click on a cover or title to order from our website.
by Tui T. Sutherland
 
Growing up in the hives, Cricket has always had a million questions. Why are trees forbidden, even in art? Why do her parents seem to hate her? And the biggest, most dangerous and secret question of all: why is Cricket immune to Queen Wasp's powers? Whenever the queen takes control of all the HiveWings, speaking through their mouths and seeing through their eyes, Cricket has to hide, terrified of being discovered. Now she's hiding again, wanted for stealing the Book of Clearsight along with her new SilkWing friends, Blue and Swordtail, and the fierce LeafWing, Sundew. The fugitives need answers, and fast, in order to prevent a LeafWing attack. But Cricket has more questions than ever. How can she stay hidden and discover the queen's deadliest secret? And if she does succeed--can a powerless dragonet really do anything to topple a regime and stop a war?
by Dav Pilkey
Out Now!
 
Is Dog Man bad to the bone? In this sixth book in the Dog Man series, the heroic hound is sent to the pound for a crime he didn't commit! While his pals work to prove his innocence, Dog Man struggles to find his place among dogs and people. Being a part of both worlds, will he ever fully fit in with one?
by Aaron Blabey
Out Now!
 
The Bad Guys have strangely acquired SUPERPOWERS! But their powers might be, well, defective. They can only do things like blow their own pants off in public. Not exactly what you'd call hero-caliber skills. Defective or not, the Bad Guys have a job to do. With Dr. Marmalade ready to destroy the world, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Snake, Mr. Piranha, and Mr. Shark finally have their chance to be (super)heroes! And this time, they may just get some help...
 
First Friday
 
On January 4, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
 
One lucky adult will win:
by John Dodge
 
The Columbus Day Storm of 1962 was a freak of nature, a weather outlier with deadly winds topping one hundred miles per hour. The storm killed dozens, injured hundreds, damaged more than fifty thousand homes, and leveled enough timber to build one million homes. This unrivaled West Coast windstorm fueled the Asian log export market, helped give birth to the Oregon wine industry, and influenced the 1962 World Series. It remains a cautionary tale and the Pacific Northwest benchmark for severe windstorms in this era of climate change and weather uncertainty. In A Deadly Wind, veteran journalist John Dodge tells a compelling story spiced with human drama, Cold War tension, and Pacific Northwest history.
 
And our kids prize is:
by Chelsea Clinton
plus a matching tote bag!
 
She Persisted is for everyone who has ever wanted to speak up but has been told to quiet down, for everyone who has ever tried to reach for the stars but was told to sit down, and for everyone who has ever been made to feel unworthy or unimportant or small. With vivid, compelling art by Alexandra Boiger, this book shows readers that no matter what obstacles may be in their paths, they shouldn't give up on their dreams. Persistence is power. This book features: Harriet Tubman, Helen Keller, Clara Lemlich, Nellie Bly, Virginia Apgar, Maria Tallchief, Claudette Colvin, Ruby Bridges, Margaret Chase Smith, Sally Ride, Florence Griffith Joyner, Oprah Winfrey, Sonia Sotomayor—and one special cameo.
 
Author Readings in January
Food and Nutrition: What Everyone Needs to Know
Tuesday, January 8, 7pm
 
Harvard- and Columbia-trained nutrition scientist Dr. P.K. Newby examines 134 stand-alone questions addressing "need to know" topics, including how what we eat affects our health and environment, from farm to fork, and why, when it comes to diet, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts--and one size doesn't fit all. At the same time, Newby debunks popular myths and food folklore, encouraging readers to "learn, unlearn, and relearn" the fundamentals of nutrition at the heart of a health-giving diet. Her passion for all things food shines through, as does her love of the power of science, technology, and engineering to help create healthier diets for ourselves, and a more sustainable future for the planet we share.
Malheur August
Thursday, January 10, 7pm
 
In the local author's novel, Jean Algood, home from college, spends the summer of 1971 questioning her parents' friends and neighbors about a photograph she finds in the ramshackle hut of the town's recently deceased "old hermit." Why did he keep a Kodak image of Jean's father, Clete, in an empty coffee can in his filthy shack? Who was the beautiful girl standing next to Clete in the photo, the one with the too-familiar eyes? This is not a bildungsroman, and it's not a murder mystery; it's a recovery tale, beautifully fragmented and waiting to be stitched back together into the crazy quilt which was "this American life" 50 or 75 years ago.
Portland Poets
Tuesday, January 15, 7pm
 
Two-thirds of Nightfall, Bill Siverly's sixth book of poetry, includes poems set in the Pacific Northwest--some from Idaho, where Bill grew up, and some from Oregon, where he currently lives. The remaining third consists of poems set in the German city of Görlitz and its environs, which extend into Poland. The poems' themes of personal aging reflect the decline of the American Empire and climate change. Yet, in the midst of such sober themes, the poems find hope in the poet's garden, engaging with family, and learning to dwell on the earth. About Barbara Drake's The Road to Lilac Hill, Oregon author Molly Gloss writes: "In these poems it's as if we are sitting across the kitchen table from a dear friend, a friend who is funny and kind, who can always find the magic in the commonplace."
Love Is Deeper Than Distance
Thursday, January 17, 7pm
 
In the local poet's new collection, she offers what we didn't know we needed: a proposal in the dark, a squad car filled with lilacs, tears saved for the right time, toast and honey. The world of illness and dying is demanding and complex. Peg documents the love of her life, her husband Fred: his diagnosis with frontal temporal lobe dementia and ALS, the loneliness of missing him before he was gone, worry for their daughter, and grieving in all its dimensions and untimeliness. Fred died at home, shortly after he turned sixty-seven. In writing, Peg uncovered tender truths, unlikely humor, the faithful awareness of deep-hearted love in an unpredictable world. And hope for the future.
Gerry Foote, Mike Langtry, and Dianne Stepp
Local Poets
Tuesday, January 22, 7pm
 
Gerry Foote will read from her new chapbook, Mouth Toward Sky, published by Finishing Line Press in 2018. Gerry is the creator of the Peace Leaves letter-pressed series of gift poems. Yearning for justice in an imperfect world, Gerry’s poems traverse the borderland between the personal and the political. Mike Langtry’s poems come from family, from things close to the ground, animals, mountain sides. Mike is an Oregon native who taught middle school Language Arts and Science in Portland for 20 years. Dianne Stepp will read from her second chapbook, Sweet Mercies, published by Finishing Line Press in 2017. Beginning with tale and image, Dianne's poems thread the realities of grief, loneliness, gratitude and joy.
Jail Blazers
Wednesday, January 23, 7pm
 
In the late '90s and early 2000s, the Portland Trail Blazers were one of the hottest teams in the NBA. However, what happened off-court was just as unforgettable as what they did on the court. While fans across the country were watching the skills of Damon Stoudamire, Rasheed Wallace, and Zach Randolph, those in Portland couldn't have been more disappointed in the players' off-court actions. This, many have mentioned, included a very racial element--which carried over to the players as well. Author Kerry Eggers, who covered the Trail Blazers during this controversial era, goes back to share the stories from the players, coaches, management, and those in Portland when the players were in the headlines as much for their play as for their legal issues.
Portland authors on Montag Press
Monday, January 28, 7pm
 
Brian Jacobson presents his debut novel, The Truth About the Moon and the Stars. Following the death of his parents, eighteen-year-old Shane Healy aimlessly drifts around 1990s Boston. An accidental phone call to mysterious senior citizen George Thurman hurls Shane into a sprawling, phantasmagorical journey that he never intended to take. Trevor Richardson presents his novel Dystopia Boy. One day a young man named Joe Blake looks back through his monitor, locks eyes with an aging US government Watcher and says, "I know you're out there. I know you're listening." Joe declares war on the system, but can he complete his mission before the Watchers track him down through his own past? Jason Rizos presents his most recent novel, Prom Night on the River of Death. When Chester and Leopold kidnap the captain of the Cheerleading team and hold her for ransom, everything goes awry.
The Alehouse at the End of the World
Thursday, January 31, 7pm
 
The local author will read from his debut novel. When a fisherman receives a mysterious letter about his beloved's demise, he sets off in his skiff to find her on the Isle of the Dead. This is an epic comedy set in the sixteenth century, where bawdy Shakespearean love triangles play out with shapeshifting avian demigods and a fertility goddess, drunken revelry, bio-dynamic gardening, and a narcissistic, bullying crow, who may have colluded with a foreign power. A raucous, aw-aw-aw-awe-inspiring romp, Stevan Allred's second book is a juicy fable for adults, and a hopeful tale for out troubled times.
 
Indie Next Picks
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for January 2019.
by Karen Thompson Walker
 
"A strange virus invades a small university community, sending its victims into deep, seemingly endless sleep and infecting them with extremely powerful dreams. This backdrop provides a perfect scenario for examining the delicate, often unrecognized line between reality and perception. As the crisis deepens, the characters are caught up in a phantasmagorical world that challenges normal conceptions of existence. A thoughtful, provocative novel of strength and beauty.” —Bill Cusumano, Square Books, Oxford, MS
by Lindsay Faye
 
"Good gracious. I just adore all things written by Lyndsay Faye. Like her glorious Gods of Gotham series, The Paragon Hotel is a clever, fast-paced read with a unique ensemble of characters. Set during the Prohibition era, the novel bounces between the mafia-ridden streets of Harlem and the racially tense community of Portland, Oregon. Steeped in historical detail, The Paragon Hotel is wickedly smart and wholly entertaining. Faye has given readers another deviously delicious story." —Anderson McKean, Page and Palette, Fairhope, AL
by Ben Winters
 
"Golden State is a gripping and brainy page-turner. Winters asks his readers to imagine California as a sovereign (and surveillance) state in which intentionally lying is the greatest federal offense. The 'Byzantine business of reality maintenance' is carried out by a team of federal agents, including our hero, Laszlo Ratesic. Golden State is a mystery in both form and content. In addition to the seemingly simple incident Laszlo investigates at the start of the novel, there's the bigger question of what a novel really is, or means, or can do in the 'good, golden, safe' world its readers are transported to. Winters is especially good at keeping his readers off-balance. Not even his biggest fans will see some of the twists and turns he's built into this, his best book yet.” —John Francisconi, Bank Square Books, Mystic, CT
by Dani Shapiro
 
"Who are we? Does who we think we are change when we learn a family secret that alters the source of our identity? Shapiro has explored issues of identity in her previous memoirs, but in her latest she applies her signature candor and heart to a riveting, provocative, and inspiring genealogical mystery and journey of discovery." —Roxanne Coady, R.J. Julia Booksellers, Madison, CT
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Paula McLain
 
"The Paris Wife and Circling the Sun were two of the most successful titles of the last decade for Alabama Booksmith, and Love and Ruin is more proof for the pudding that Paula McLain is a member of the master class of historical fiction writers. This exciting page-turner follows Martha Gellhorn as she reports from the center of the action of the Spanish Civil War, then jeopardizes her reputation and very existence by falling in love with the greatest literary giant of the day, Ernest Hemingway. This spectacular read is fact-based and deliciously entertaining."
— Jake Reiss, The Alabama Booksmith, Birmingham, AL
by Jonathan Miles
 
"A priest, a doctor, and a reality TV producer walk into a convenience store... Actually, the notable walker in this story is Cameron Harris, a paralyzed soldier who inexplicably rises from his wheelchair and starts walking in the Biz-E-Bee parking lot. Anatomy of a Miracle follows Harris and the aforementioned sundry characters in the aftermath and dissection of this reported 'miracle.' Was it science? Was it divine? Was it a hoax? Will it make for a hit TV show? Jonathan Miles's charming--and often humorous--novel explores the varying perspectives on faith, truth, and the unexpected consequences of the miraculous."
— Lelia Nebeker, One More Page, Arlington, VA
 
New in Mystery
 
Here are some of the latest mysteries and thrillers:
by Louise Penny
 
A peculiar letter arrives inviting Armand Gamache to an abandoned farmhouse, and the former head of the Sûreté du Québec discovers that a complete stranger has named him one of the executors of her will. When a body is found, the terms of the bizarre will suddenly seem far more menacing. But it isn't the only menace Gamache is facing. Enough narcotic to kill thousands has disappeared into inner city Montreal. With the deadly drug about to hit the streets, Gamache races for answers. As he uses increasingly audacious, even desperate, measures to retrieve the drug, Gamache begins to see his own blind spots. And the terrible things hiding there.
by Lee Child
 
On a country road deep in the New England woods, Reacher sees a sign to a place he has never been: the town where his father was born. At the same moment, in the same isolated area, a car breaks down. Two young Canadians had been on their way to New York City to sell a treasure. Now they’re stranded at a lonely motel in the middle of nowhere. The next morning, in the city clerk’s office, Reacher asks about the old family home. He’s told no one named Reacher ever lived in town. He’s always known his father left and never returned, but now Reacher wonders, Was he ever there in the first place? As Reacher explores his father’s life, and as the Canadians face lethal dangers, strands of different stories begin to merge. Then Reacher makes a shocking discovery: The present can be tough, but the past can be tense . . . and deadly.
by Joe Ide
 
Isaiah Quintabe--IQ for short--has never been more successful, or felt more alone. A series of high-profile wins in his hometown of East Long Beach have made him so notorious that he can hardly go to the corner store without being recognized. Dodson, once his sidekick, is now his full-fledged partner, hell-bent on giving IQ's PI business some real legitimacy: a Facebook page, and IQ's promise to stop accepting Christmas sweaters and carpet cleanings in exchange for PI services. So when a young painter approaches IQ for help tracking down her missing mother, it's not just the case Isaiah's looking for, but the human connection. And when his new confidant turns out to be connected to a dangerous paramilitary operation, IQ falls victim to a threat even a genius can't see coming. Waiting for Isaiah around every corner is Seb, the Oxford-educated African gangster who was responsible for the death of his brother, Marcus.
by John Grisham
 
Pete Banning was Clanton, Mississippi's favorite son—a decorated World War II hero, the patriarch of a prominent family, a farmer, father, neighbor, and a faithful member of the Methodist church. Then one cool October morning he rose early, drove into town, and committed a shocking crime. Pete's only statement about it was: "I have nothing to say." He was not afraid of death and was willing to take his motive to the grave. In a major novel unlike anything he has written before, John Grisham takes us on an incredible journey, from the Jim Crow South to the jungles of the Philippines during World War II; from an insane asylum filled with secrets to the Clanton courtroom where Pete's defense attorney tries desperately to save him.

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