February 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next, and New Biographies and Memoirs!

February 2019: Author Readings, Indie Next, and New Biographies and Memoirs!
 
Find out which authors are reading here soon, see which titles indie booksellers are loving this month, check out our First Friday prizes, and discover some new memoirs and biographies. But first....
 
New Releases
 
These three books are among the cream of the crop for February. Click on a cover or title to pre-order from our website.
by Marlon James
Out: February 5th
 
Myth, fantasy, and history come together to explore what happens when a mercenary is hired to find a missing child. Tracker is known far and wide for his skills as a hunter: "He has a nose," people say. Engaged to track down a mysterious boy who disappeared three years earlier, Tracker breaks his own rule of always working alone when he finds himself part of a group that comes together to search for the boy. The band is a hodgepodge, full of unusual characters with secrets of their own, including a shape-shifting man-animal known as Leopard. Drawing from African history and mythology and his own rich imagination, Marlon James has written a novel unlike anything that's come before it: a saga of breathtaking adventure that's also an ambitious, involving read. Defying categorization and full of unforgettable characters, Black Leopard, Red Wolf is both surprising and profound as it explores the fundamentals of truth, the limits of power, and our need to understand them both.
by Trevor Noah
Out: February 5th
 
The author's unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show began with a criminal act: his birth. Trevor was born to a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents' indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the earliest years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, steal him away. Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. This is a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother's unconventional, unconditional love.
by Ann Leckie
Out: February 26th
 
Gods meddle in the fates of men, men play with the fates of gods, and a pretender must be cast down from the throne in this breathtaking first fantasy novel from Ann Leckie. For centuries, the kingdom of Iraden has been protected by the god known as the Raven. His will is enacted through the Raven's Lease, a human ruler chosen by the god himself. Under the Raven's watch, the city flourishes. But the power of the Raven is weakening. A usurper has claimed the throne. The kingdom borders are tested by invaders who long for the prosperity that Vastai boasts. And they have made their own alliances with other gods. It is into this unrest that the warrior Eolo--aide to Mawat, the true Lease--arrives. And in seeking to help Mawat reclaim his city, Eolo discovers that the Raven's Tower holds a secret. Its foundations conceal a dark history that has been waiting to reveal itself... and to set in motion a chain of events that could destroy Iraden forever.
 
First Friday
 
On February 1, visit us during First Friday in Multnomah Village.
 
For your browsing enjoyment, we'll be serving wine. Plus, we'll be giving away great prizes for our monthly drawings. Drop by Annie Bloom's anytime after 6:00 on Friday night to sign up.
 
One lucky adult will win:
by Toby Mitchell
 
A weekend venture, in this age of travel, can be one of our greatest commodities. To explore and personally experience new and previously unseen cities and landscapes of this world is becoming all the more possible–particularly as we learn how to make the most of our precious (but limited) time at the weekend. Photographer Toby Mitchell presents a vibrant portrait of Portland. Iconic landmarks and trendy as well as less well-known places demonstrate the spirit of the city.
 
And our kids prize is:
by Sherri Duskey Rinker and Patrick McDonnell
 
From the author of Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site and the creator of Me . . . Jane and The Skunk, comes this funny and tender love letter from a parent to her child. Before YOU came along, so many things were different! But now there's a giggly baby, a house full of adventures and toys, a million little surprises. . . . And so much love.
 
Upcoming Author Readings
Voices from Bears Ears
Wednesday, February 27, 7pm
 
A land rich in human history and unsurpassed in natural beauty, Bears Ears is at the heart of a national debate over the future of public lands. Through the stories of twenty individuals, and informed by interviews with more than seventy people, Voices from Bears Ears captures the passions of those who fought to protect Bears Ears and those who opposed the monument as a federal "land grab" that threatened to rob them of their economic future. Journalist Rebecca Robinson provides context and perspective for understanding the ongoing debate and humanizes the abstract issues at the center of the debate. Interwoven with these stories are photographs of the interviewees and the land they consider sacred by photographer Stephen E. Strom. Through word and image, Robinson and Strom allow us to both hear and see the people whose lives are intertwined with this special place.
Book Signing Only!
Monday, March 4, 5:30-7:00pm
 
The local author will be signing copies of her new book, Mastering the Business of Organizing. Anne M. Blumer, CPO(R), owner and founder of SolutionsForYou Inc. and the Institute for Professional Organizers(TM), has trained hundreds of professional organizers from 17 countries, and in this guide, she explores how to turn your love of organizing into a full-fledged career. Mastering the Business of Organizing is an essential guide for professional organizers and productivity consultants, and it advances the message and vision of the National Association of Productivity & Organizing Professionals.
St. Nicholas Salvage & Wrecking
Tuesday, March 5, 7pm
 
Join us for the Portland thriller author's launch of his latest novel. Michael Patrick Finnigan was a New York City cop and a US Marshal. Katalin Fiero Dahar was a soldier, spy, and assassin for Spain. Together, they created St. Nicholas Salvage & Wrecking, a largely illegal bounty hunting operation based in Cyprus and working throughout Europe. Someone is kidnapping Middle Eastern refugee children as they flee war-torn countries and selling them into prostitution around the world. Finnigan and Fiero get the assignment to track them down and save the refugees. The battle to stop the mass kidnappings ranges from Belgrade and Zagreb, to the Loire Valley and Milan, and to the plains of Kosovo. As Finnigan and Fiero close in, the conspirators realize that the judge of the ICC is the real threat and plan an assassination. Now the partners have to save their patron and the kidnapped refugees from a rogue military force with nothing left to lose.
The Perfect Alibi
Wednesday, March 6, 7pm
 
The Portland mystery author returns to Annie Bloom's for the launch of his latest book. Robin Lockwood is a young lawyer with a prestigious small law firm and a former MMA fighter who helped pay for Yale Law School with her bouts. She is representing a rape victim for her civil lawsuit against her rapist. At the same time, another client is up on a murder charge—one that should be dismissed as self-defense—but the D.A. trying the case is determined to bring it to trial. Now she has to mastermind two impossible cases, trying to find the hidden truth that links the two of them. Phillip Margolin, the master of the legal thriller, returns in one of his twistiest, most compelling crime novels yet.
Flamingo Lane
Thursday, March 7, 7pm
 
We welcome back the local author to read from his latest novel of Southern noir. Chance is a hitman with hippie roots and deep emotional wounds, disillusioned by life and stung by love--and his next target is the woman who rejected him. But, as he closes in on his victim, Chance struggles to rediscover the competitive edge that normally makes him so deadly. Faye Lindstrom escaped a life of captivity and addiction in Quintana Roo, but she can't flee the woman she has become. For now, she holes up in a house in Crooked River owned by an old friend, hoping that the violence in her past doesn't catch up to her. Flamingo Lane is a gritty cat-and-mouse pursuit that launches from an island off the Yucatan Peninsula through the cornfields of Indiana to a small town on the Florida panhandle.
Reading
Monday, March 18, 7pm
 
Pacific Northwest authors Vlautin and Evison will read from the paperback editions of their latest novels. In Willy Vlautin's Don't Skip Out on Me, Horace Hopper is a half-Paiute, half-Irish ranch hand who wants to be somebody. He's spent most of his life on the ranch of his kindly guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Reese. But, while the Reeses treat him like a son, Horace decides to leave the only loving home he's known to prove his worth by training to become a boxer. Mr. Reese is holding on to a way of life that is no longer sustainable. He's a seventy-two-year-old rancher with a bad back. He's not sure how he'll keep things going without Horace, but he knows the boy must find his own way. In Jonathan Evison's Lawn Boy, Mike Muñoz is a young Chicano living in Washington State. Not too many years out of high school and still doing menial work—and just fired from his latest gig as a lawn boy on a landscaping crew—he knows that he's got to be the one to shake things up if he's ever going to change his life. But how? Lawn Boy is an important, entertaining, and completely winning novel about social class distinctions, about overcoming cultural discrimination, and about standing up for oneself.
La Luministe
Thursday, March 21, 7pm
 
The local author reads from her debut novel. Berthe Morisot was a fist in a velvet glove. In 19th century Paris, an haute-bourgeois woman was expected to be discreet to the point of near-invisibility. But Berthe, forbidden to enter L'Ecole des Beaux Arts, started the art movement that broke open the walls of the art establishment. And, unable to marry the love of her life, Edouard Manet, she married his brother. While she epitomized femininity and decorum, Morisot was a quiet revolutionary. As an Impressionist, she created light-infused paintings of women in reverie that the other members of the group deemed the most avant-garde of them all. They called Morisot La Luministe, the painter of light. Her portraits depict women lost in thought, not as objects of the male gaze, but possessing an interior life.
 
February 2019 Indie Next Picks
 
Every month, the coalition of independent bookstores puts together a list of titles recommended by booksellers across the country. Come in to browse the titles below, along with other great new bookseller picks for February 2019.
by Stephanie Land
 
"Stephanie Land's Maid is a must-read of the highest order, a memoir of a single mother struggling to survive while performing the household labor that many of us take for granted. While at once deeply personal—you'll fall hard for Stephanie and her daughter, Mia—it is also essential social commentary about how we treat the myriad domestic laborers who toil in our homes, oftentimes unseen and unappreciated. Read it alongside Nickel and Dimed or Evicted for a stunning, unforgettable look at American poverty and determination." —Emilie Sommer, East City Bookshop, Washington, DC
by Valeria Luiselli
 
"Really incredible fiction takes you on a journey, and somewhere along the way you realize how much of it reflects your own reality. In Lost Children Archive, Valeria Luiselli's narrator is highly observant of her inner life and the world around her. She unravels a story that's about family and how walls between people and nations are built—and what they damage. In reading this book, I felt like I was in the car on the family's road trip—feeling all the conflicting emotions that Luiselli's narrator is feeling as a partner, mother, and resident in todays United States." —Zoey Cole, Books Are Magic, Brooklyn, NY
by Pam Houston
 
"I can't decide if Mineral County, Colorado, is a piece of heaven or if it's actually heaven. Either way, it is a wondrous Rocky Mountain paradise—a paradise beset by bitter cold, fires, and various degrees of hardship, but always exquisite beauty. Pam Houston has 120 acres of it, and readers get a glimpse of life and death on the ranch in this marvelous combination of memoir and nature writing. Both deeply personal and wide-reaching, Deep Creek is about the human capacity to feel grief and joy all at once for the ground beneath one's feet and the planet as a whole." —Stan Hynds, Northshire Bookstore, Saratoga Springs, NY
by Tara Conklin
 
"Oh, my! I was so moved by this book it brought me to tears. Fiona, Renee, Catherine, and Joe invaded my imagination and kept me spellbound until the end. Siblings! Many of us have them and often don't think about the nuances of our relationships. Conklin's story brought my own siblings to mind and questions emerged that can't be pursued on paper. Memories are such powerful things and affect our lives in compelling ways. There is so much love in this story. It's absolutely wonderful! Please read it!” —Stephanie Crowe, Page and Palette, Fairhope, AL
 
These previous Indie Next picks are now available in paperback!
by Ariel Lawhon
 
"By far the best historical fiction title I've read in a long time! Not only is the story historically accurate, but the way it unfolds is unique and significantly adds to the plot and character development. Even though most readers today probably know how the book ends before they even start it, Ariel Lawhon's masterful storytelling will leave you cheering for or jeering at one of the Anastasias - which one is up to you!"
— Kari Erpenbach, University of Minnesota Bookstores, Minneapolis, MN
by Liam Callanan
 
"In Paris, there is a bookstore called The Late Edition, where books are shelved geographically, and while readers can find any book by its story's setting, the store's proprietor Leah cannot locate her missing husband and searches for him throughout the city. In Paris by the Book, Paris is equal parts Madeline and The Red Balloon, the children's books that shape Leah's view of the City of Light. I'd compare Callanan's engrossing third novel to The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry and The Little Paris Bookshop, but with its confounding but ultimately loveable heroine, there's a bit of Where'd You Go, Bernadette in the story as well. This captivating novel is filled with rich characters, a twisty plot, a bit of mystery, and a heaping dollop of joie de vivre."
— Daniel Goldin, Boswell Book Company, Milwaukee, WI
 
New in Biography/Memoir
 
Here are some of the latest from our Biography and Memoir section:
by Dani Shapiro
 
What makes us who we are? What combination of memory, history, biology, experience, and that ineffable thing called the soul defines us? In the spring of 2016, through a genealogy website to which she had whimsically submitted her DNA for analysis, Dani Shapiro received the stunning news that her father was not her biological father. She woke up one morning and her entire history--the life she had lived--crumbled beneath her. Inheritance is a book about secrets--secrets within families, kept out of shame or self-protectiveness; secrets we keep from one another in the name of love. It is the story of a woman's urgent quest to unlock the story of her own identity, a story that has been scrupulously hidden from her for more than fifty years, years she had spent writing brilliantly, and compulsively, on themes of identity and family history. It is a book about the extraordinary moment we live in--a moment in which science and technology have outpaced not only medical ethics but also the capacities of the human heart to contend with the consequences of what we discover.
edited by Elizabeth Samet
 
One hundred and thirty-three years after its 1885 publication by Mark Twain, Elizabeth Samet has annotated this lavish edition of Grant's landmark memoir, and expands the Civil War backdrop against which this monumental American life is typically read. No previous edition combines such a sweep of historical and cultural contexts with the literary authority that Samet, an English professor obsessed with Grant for decades, brings to the table. Never has Grant's transformation from tanner's son to military leader been more insightfully and passionately explained than in this timely edition, appearing on the 150th anniversary of Grant's 1868 presidential election.
by Kamala Harris
 
By reckoning with the big challenges we face together, drawing on the hard-won wisdom and insight from her own career and the work of those who have most inspired her, Senator Kamala Harris offers a master class in problem solving, in crisis management, and leadership in challenging times. Through the arc of her own life, on into the great work of our day, she communicates a vision of shared struggle, shared purpose, and shared values. In a book rich in many home truths, not least is that a relatively small number of people work very hard to convince a great many of us that we have less in common than we actually do, but it falls to us to look past them and get on with the good work of living our common truth. When we do, our shared effort will continue to sustain us and this great nation, now and in the years to come.
The Monk of Mokha (Paperback)
by Dave Eggers
 
Mokhtar Alkhanshali is twenty-four and working as a doorman when he discovers the astonishing history of coffee and Yemen's central place in it. He leaves San Francisco and travels deep into his ancestral homeland to tour terraced farms high in the country’s rugged mountains and meet beleagured but determined farmers. But when war engulfs the country and Saudi bombs rain down, Mokhtar has to find a way out of Yemen without sacrificing his dreams or abandoning his people.